Benefits of Cord Blood Banking Questions

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Answers to questions about cord blood and tissue stem cells, what banking could mean for your family, plus clarification of common misconceptions about cord blood banking.

Cord Blood Stem Cells

Cord Tissue Stem Cells

Newborn Stem Cell Banking and Your Family

Common Misconceptions

Cord Blood Stem Cells

What is cord blood?
Cord blood is the blood that remains in your newborn's umbilical cord after birth. Cord blood is an invaluable source of a pristine type of stem cell that can be used in a variety of medical treatments.

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What are stem cells?
Stem cells are the body's "master cells" because they are the building blocks of organ tissues, blood, and the immune system. Stem cells from bone marrow were first used to regenerate blood and immune cells for patients who had received chemotherapy for cancer. In the late 1980s, doctors started using cord blood stem cells to treat diseases that had previously been treated with bone marrow transplantation.

Today, cord blood stem cells are successfully being used to save lives. They also are being researched in an exciting new area of medicine called regenerative medicine, where scientists are studying the use of cord blood stem cells in experimental treatments for conditions like brain injury and acquired hearing loss.

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Are cord blood stem cells different than other stem cells?
Yes. Cord blood stem cells are biologically younger and are more flexible compared to adult stem cells from other sources like bone marrow. When saved, they have unique qualities and advantages:

  • Less risk of complications when used in transplants39
  • Immediately available and can minimize disease progression in early treatment40
  • Preserving them "stops the clock" and protects the cells from aging and being exposed to environmental factors and common viruses that can decrease their function41
  • Simple, safe, and painless to collect

Cord blood stem cells are not embryonic stem cells and are not controversial.

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What is cord blood banking, and how is it done?
Cord blood banking is a one-time opportunity to save your baby's cord blood stem cells for potential medical uses. Having cord blood saved can be lifesaving or life-changing for your baby or other family members and ensures that these cells are immediately available if ever needed. Collecting cord blood is a simple, safe, and painless procedure that usually takes less than five minutes and happens immediately after birth. After the umbilical cord has been cut, the remaining blood in the cord is collected. The cord blood is then shipped to the laboratory, processed, and frozen in cryogenic storage tanks for long-term preservation.
If you do not save your baby's cord blood, it will be discarded after birth.

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How is cord blood used in medical treatments?
Cord blood stem cells have been successfully used in transplant medicine for more than 20 years. Cord blood has been used to treat many life-threatening diseases including leukemia, other cancers, blood disorders, metabolic disorders, and immune diseases.

Cord blood also is being used in regenerative medicine research, where stem cells are being evaluated for their ability to induce healing and regenerate cells to repair tissues. Clinical trials are evaluating a child's own cord blood stem cell infusions as experimental therapies to treat cerebral palsy, brain injury, juvenile diabetes, and acquired hearing loss.

Your physician will determine if cord blood stem cells should be used and if one's own stem cells or a matched donor's would be the best course of treatment. Like other medical procedures, therapies using cord blood may involve risk, which should be discussed with your physician.

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How likely is it that my family will need to use stem cells?
The use of cord blood has increased significantly in the past 15 years. As uses expand, so does the likelihood that the stem cells may be needed by a member of your family. Based on the most recent data, the likelihood of needing a stem cell transplant from any source is:

  • 1 in 217 – for an individual (by age 70), using his or her own stem cells or someone else's42

However, this data does not reflect potential therapies using stem cells that may be developed in the future. Currently, there are more than 30 FDA-regulated clinical trials researching medical uses for cord blood stem cells, including studies for cerebral palsy, brain injury, juvenile diabetes, and hearing loss.

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Does having more stem cells matter for treatment outcomes?
Yes. In transplant medicine, having more stem cells can improve medical outcomes, including faster recovery and fewer complications.10,11

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What is graft vs. host disease (GvHD)?
GvHD is one of the most common and life-threatening side effects of using stem cells from another individual or "donor" to treat the patient. In fact, GvHD is the leading cause of death following a transplant. GvHD occurs when the transplanted stem cells from a donor recognize the recipient's body as foreign and attack it. Stem cells from cord blood are less likely to cause GvHD than bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells. Family banked cord blood can help reduce GvHD and improve treatment outcomes because:

  • The stem cells in cord blood are more flexible and less reactive than adult stem cells from other sources43
  • Cord blood used between family members has a lower risk of GvHD compared to cord blood from unrelated donors 28,29

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What is HLA matching?
HLA matching is the criteria used to determine donor and recipient compatibility. In cord blood, it generally refers to six proteins called human leukocyte antigens (HLA) that appear on the surface of white blood cells and other tissues in the body. A transplant will only be performed if there is an adequate HLA match between the donor and recipient. A perfect six out of six match is best. Siblings have a 25% chance of being a perfect match.27

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Cord Tissue Stem Cells

What is cord tissue?
Cord tissue is your baby's umbilical cord, which contains mesenchymal stem cells. These stem cells can form connective tissues such as bone, cartilage, and tendon, and have unique properties that make them promising for cellular therapies. Studies are evaluating cord tissue stem cells as possible treatments for many injuries and diseases.

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How are cord tissue stem cells being researched for use in medical treatments?
Stem cells from cord tissue have demonstrated the power to heal spinal cord, brain, and cartilage injuries in laboratory studies. This research is now beginning to move into clinical trials. It is at an early stage and medical treatments may never be developed.

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What is cord tissue banking, and how is it done?
CBR is the first bank to offer U.S. families the opportunity to save a segment of their babies' umbilical cords. The primary cells in cord tissue are different from the primary cells found in cord blood and may help repair the body in different ways. Saving both sources of stems cells may offer even more access to medicine in the future.

After your baby's umbilical cord has been clamped and cut, and after cord blood collection, your doctor or midwife will collect a 4- to 8-inch segment of the umbilical cord and place it in the CBR CordCup® container. The collection kit is then returned to CBR's laboratory by an express courier. Cord tissue collection is safe for both the mother and baby and can be done after vaginal or C-section births.

Because cord tissue research is still in its early stages, CBR stores your baby's cord tissue whole, preserving all of the cells within it for your family's potential future use. The cord tissue is cryogenically stored for long-term preservation so it can be processed to extract the cells needed using the best technology of the future.

If you do not save your baby's cord tissue, it is discarded as medical waste.

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How are cord tissue stem cells different from cord blood stem cells?
Cord tissue is a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells, which create connective tissue. Cord blood is a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells, which create the blood and immune system. Because of the different functions of these stem cells, cord blood and cord tissue may help repair the body in different ways.  Cord tissue research is still in its early stages, and safe and effective therapies may never be developed.

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Newborn Stem Cell Banking and Your Family

Why are there stem cells in the umbilical cord?
Stem cells are found throughout the body, but in larger numbers in the blood system. Stress on the body can cause even more stem cells to circulate in the blood, and birth is a very stressful event for a newborn.

Once the baby is born, the blood that remains in the umbilical cord still contains a “reservoir” of stem-cell rich blood that can be easily collected without risk to the newborn or mother.

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Why do families choose to collect and store their babies' cord blood?
Banking may give families a powerful resource against injuries and diseases that can occur in the future. Every month, thousands of new parents, a number of them doctors, nurses, and scientists, store their newborn's stem cells with CBR.  Some of the important reasons to save cord blood include the following:

  • Cord blood is a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells, which are used in transplant medicine to treat many life-threatening diseases, such as leukemia and other cancers. As with other medical procedures, therapies using cord blood may involve risk, which should be discussed with a physician.
  • Cord blood is being evaluated today for its ability to treat cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury, acquired hearing loss, and juvenile diabetes.
  • Your baby's cord blood is available for your family if needed for treatment, without the need for painful and potentially time-consuming bone marrow harvest surgery. Early treatment can minimize disease progression.40
  • If ever required for a transplant, using your own family's cord blood instead of an unrelated donor's can have significant advantages, including fewer complications and improved medical outcomes28,29
  • Current clinical trials in the U.S. that use cord blood require the child's own stem cells

More specific reasons families save cord blood include:

  • Having a family history of disease
  • Having a baby of an ethnic minority or mixed ethnicity, in which there is greater difficulty finding stem cell donors33
  • Adopting a newborn and wanting a valuable source of stem cells genetically identical to the adopted baby

It is important to know that, for certain inherited genetic conditions, the child's own cord blood may not be used; in those cases, a matched sibling's stem cells would be the first choice. There is no guarantee that an adequate stem cell match will be found for any given patient.28,29

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What are my options for saving my baby's cord blood?
You have two options to save your baby's cord blood:
Family banking: Your baby's cord blood is stored for a fee for exclusive use by your family.
Newborn Possibilities Program®: CBR offers cord blood and cord tissue collection, processing and storage at no cost for five years when a family member has been diagnosed with a condition that can be treated with stem cells.
Public donation: Your baby's cord blood is donated anonymously for potential use by a patient who needs a transplant. You must give birth in a participating hospital.

If you choose not to family bank or donate, your baby's cord blood is discarded at the hospital.

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How do I donate my baby's cord blood to a public bank?
With public donation, you may be able to donate your baby's cord blood for use by an anonymous patient in need. In 2009, the National Marrow Donor Program® facilitated more than 4,800 marrow and cord blood transplants for patients who did not have matching donors in the family. For more information about donation, visit BeTheMatch.org.

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Who can use my baby's cord blood stem cells?
Any family member who is a suitable match may be able to use your baby's cord blood stem cells for transplant medicine. Siblings are the most likely to be compatible matches, with 25% of these cases offering a perfect match. It is less likely that other family members will be a sufficient match, and there is no guarantee that an adequate stem cell match will be found for any given patient.

Your baby will always be a perfect match to his or her own stem cells and may use them for a number of diseases, however, not generally for inherited genetic conditions. In those cases, a matched sibling's stem cells would be the first choice.

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How likely is it that my family will need to use stem cells?
The use of cord blood has increased significantly in the past 15 years. As uses expand, so does the likelihood that the stem cells may be needed by a member of your family. Based on the most recent data, the likelihood of needing a stem cell transplant from any source is:

  • 1 in 217 – for an individual (by age 70), using his or her own stem cells or someone else's42

However, this data does not reflect potential therapies using stem cells that may be developed in the future. Currently, there are more than 30 FDA-regulated clinical trials researching medical uses for cord blood stem cells, including studies for cerebral palsy, brain injury, juvenile diabetes, and hearing loss.

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Does having more stem cells matter for treatment outcomes?
Yes. In transplant medicine, having more stem cells can improve medical outcomes, including faster recovery and fewer complications.10,11

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Should I save cord blood for all of my children?
Yes. Saving cord blood for each child gives your family more options because:

  • Each child has access to his or her own genetically unique cells. Your baby may use the stem cells for a number of diseases, however, not generally for inherited genetic conditions. In those cases, a matched sibling's stem cells would be the first choice. For experimental regenerative medicine therapies that use cord blood, the child's own stem cells are currently required.
  • There is increased likelihood that a family member in need will have access to a related source of cord blood for treatment.
  • Expecting identical twins? It is still important to save cord blood for each child as it is extremely difficult to determine if twins are indeed identical. Each child's cord blood is banked separately.

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How long can the stem cells be stored?
According to published regulatory guidelines and current science involving cryogenic storage of cells, cord blood stem cells can be stored indefinitely under the proper conditions.44,45

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What if someone in my family is sick now and needs my child's cord blood?
Our Newborn Possibilities Program® provides cord blood and cord tissue collection, processing, and five years of storage at no cost to eligible families with a medical need. Families may apply to the Designated Treatment Program for a qualifying relative who has been diagnosed with a life-threatening disease treatable with donor stem cells. For more information on the Designated Treatment Program, please click here.

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If someone in my family needs a transplant, could we find a donated sample from a public bank?
Possibly. However, if a patient is in need of a transplant, the physician will look first for a suitable stem cell donor within the patient's family. Using cord blood from your own family has advantages for treating cancers and blood disorders. Matched cord blood from within your own family can result in:

  • Fewer complications
  • Improved medical outcomes28,29

Additionally, saving cord blood for all of your children is important for participation in current clinical trials, for which the child's own cord blood is required. There is no guarantee that an adequate stem cell match will be found in either a public bank or within your family.

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Are there risks involved in newborn stem cell treatments?
Like any medical procedure, newborn stem cell treatments may involve risks, which should be discussed with your doctor. Ultimate use of newborn stem cells will be determined by your treating physician.

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Does CBR own its laboratory?
Yes. Our cutting-edge laboratory was designed and built specifically for newborn stem cell processing and storage. At 80,000-square feet and currently holding more than 400,000 cord blood and tissue samples and with the capacity to safely store cord blood for more than five million newborns, our laboratory is the largest newborn stem cell bank in the world. CBR's lab is located in Tucson, Arizona, one of the safest cities in the nation in terms of risk from hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, winter storms, and tornados.6

Our state-of-the-art processing, quality-control, and quality-assurance metrics are in accordance with FDA guidelines, and we are accredited by the AABB (formerly the American Association of Blood Banks) and certified by CLIA (a federal program to ensure quality laboratory testing). CBR's storage technology system provides highly secure, long-term protection for your baby's stem cells.

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If I move internationally, will you ship the sample if I need it?
Yes. CBR can generally send your family’s sample for treatment anywhere you need it, subject to local regulations. Please contact us so that we can discuss specifics about your family’s situation.

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Common Misconceptions

Misconception:
"Cord blood collection takes important blood away from my baby."

Fact:
Cord blood collection is painless, easy, and safe for both mother and newborn. The cord blood is collected after your baby is born and the umbilical cord has been clamped and cut. The cord blood being collected is blood that would normally be discarded after birth. Your caregiver will not alter the normal birthing process in any way, except to collect your baby's cord blood. Cord blood collection can take place after a vaginal or C-section birth and collection can still be performed after delayed clamping.

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Misconception:
"The chances that a family with no history of cancer or disease will ever need their banked cord blood are so low that people shouldn't bother doing it."

Fact:
Families save their babies' cord blood stem cells with CBR for peace of mind because they don't want to take the chance of not banking when these stem cells may one day be lifesaving to someone in their family. Many families have no history of disease but recognize the current and future value of their newborns' cord blood stem cells as a resource for medical treatments.

Family History:
Family history is not a reliable indicator of need because most forms of leukemia (the most common reason for needing a stem cell transplant) are not hereditary, and the causes of many cancers and diseases are unknown. In fact, numerous serious diseases treatable with cord blood are not hereditary and occur without warning.

Odds of Use:
Although no one can predict future illness or injury, published estimates of the odds of needing stem cells for current uses in transplant medicine are 1 in 217.42

Based on current data, cord blood stem cells should remain useful indefinitely, so your family may be able to use the cells for diseases and injuries that occur decades from now.44,45 The fastest growing use of cord blood stem cells for CBR families has been in regenerative medicine research for the treatment of brain injury, for which there is no family history, and juvenile diabetes.

  • Transplant Medicine: In transplant medicine, a patient generally will undergo chemotherapy to treat the underlying disease and then receive an infusion of cord blood stem cells to create a new healthy blood and immune system. In fact, cord blood stem cells have been used to treat many life-threatening diseases, such as leukemia and other cancers.
  • Regenerative Medicine: New research with cord blood focuses on regenerative medicine, where doctors evaluate stem cells ability to repair damaged tissues and organs in the body.

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Misconception:
"The cord blood stem cells may not remain useful after long-term storage."

Fact:
Based on published regulatory guidelines and current science involving cryogenic storage of cells, cord blood stem cells should remain useful indefinitely, so your family may be able to use the cells for diseases and injuries that occur decades from now.44,45

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Banking with CBR Questions

Find answers to why CBR is the most experienced and trusted bank plus clarify common umbilical cord banking misconceptions.

Experience, Expertise and Standards

Collection, Processing and Storage

The CBR Gift Registry

Common Misconceptions

Experience, Expertise and Standards

What is unique about CBR?
CBR has been the leading innovator in cord blood banking for more than 15 years and is the #1 choice of Ob/Gyns and expectant families.4,15

  • CBR is the most experienced cord blood bank. CBR has saved cord blood stem cells for more than 500,000 newborns and has helped many families use their stem cells for lifesaving transplants and other therapies.
  • CBR saves more cord blood cells for families. CBR offers the best collection and processing technology available to save more cells.1-3  Having more stem cells for treatment can improve medical outcomes if the cells are ever needed.10,11
  • CBR's long-term stability is well established. Our track record of financially-sound decisions demonstrates our commitment that we will be here for you in the future. Additionally, CBR's laboratory is located in Tucson, Arizona, one of the safest cities in the nation in terms of risk from hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, winter storms, and tornados.6

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What does enrolling with CBR mean?
Enrolling with CBR means that you have decided to save your baby's cord blood with CBR, a family bank. Saving privately means that your baby's stem cells will be available for your family's use, should the need ever arise and the family member is an HLA match for the stem cells. There is a fee to save privately, but you will not be charged until after your baby's cord blood is safely stored.

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What federal or state guidelines or regulations does CBR follow?
CBR's processing, quality-control, and quality-assurance metrics are in accordance with FDA guidelines in addition to being accredited by the AABB (formerly the American Association of Blood Banks) and certified by CLIA (a federal program to ensure quality laboratory testing). In addition, we are licensed in the states that require special licensing, specifically New York (for both Cord Blood and Cord Tissue), New Jersey, Maryland, Illinois, and California . CBR's quality management system is ISO 9001:2008 certified.

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How much experience does CBR have in providing cord blood for use in treatment?
CBR has more experience providing cord blood for use in treatment than any other family bank. To date, we have released more than 200 samples for families to use. All of the cord blood units released for client use have been viable — the ultimate validation of our processing and storage methods.

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Does CBR have affiliations with research institutions?
Yes. CBR has a long-term affiliation with the University of Arizona through Dr. David T. Harris, professor of microbiology and immunology. Dr. Harris was the first to preserve a child's own cord blood stem cells for future use.

CBR also has established leadership in advancing clinical research with newborn stem cells. We are the exclusive family bank partner for studies at several prestigious medical institutions, including Georgia Health Sciences University, Memorial Hermann Healthcare Institution and The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UT Health).

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How many cord blood samples has CBR stored?
CBR has saved cord blood stem cells for more than 500,000 newborns and has helped many families use their stem cells for lifesaving transplants and other therapies. Our long history of experience and proven track record delivers confidence in the quality and dependability of our service.

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Is CBR a financially stable company?
Yes. CBR's consistent corporate leadership and financial stability is unparalleled in this industry. Our continued investment in the best technology and our state-of-the-art lab demonstrates our commitment to being here for you in the future.

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How does CBR ensure the confidentiality of my personal information?
CBR takes confidentiality seriously. Because of the sensitive nature of families' medical information, all CBR employees sign confidentiality agreements. The collection and use of your personal information is governed by our privacy policy. Click here to view our privacy policy.

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Collection, Processing and Storage

How many healthcare providers have collected for CBR?
More than 35,000 healthcare providers have collected cord blood for our clients at more than 3,500 hospitals and birthing centers throughout the U.S. and in more than 80 countries. We have provided extensive educational resources and training to physicians, midwives, and hospitals to help ensure effective collections.

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How long has cord blood banking been available?
The opportunity for expectant families to collect and store their newborns' umbilical cord blood stem cells has been available since late 1995. Currently, thousands of parents are taking advantage of this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. In fact, CBR has banked cord blood for more than 500,000 newborns.

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Does my CBR CellAdvantage Collection Kit have to be kept at room temperature at all times?
Yes. Your collection kit should be kept at room temperature both before and after your baby's cord blood and cord tissue collection. Never refrigerate the collection kit or expose it to freezing temperatures or extreme heat, like in a closed vehicle or car trunk. 

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When and how is the cord blood collected?
Cord blood collection occurs after birth, immediately after the umbilical cord has been cut. The remaining blood in the cord is drawn into a collection bag. Your healthcare provider can collect cord blood after a vaginal or C-section birth. The CBR CellAdvantage® collection system helps experienced providers collect more cord blood.

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What is red blood cell (or RBC) depletion?
Red blood cell depletion or reduction is a procedure performed by almost every cord blood bank prior to cryogenic storage. It is the process of removing most of the red blood cells from a cord blood sample before storage.

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Why do most cord blood banks remove the majority of red blood cells from a cord blood collection before storage?
Most cord blood banks, including CBR, remove the majority of red blood cells from the sample because they may cause severe complications if the sample is used in a transplant. Red blood cells are not part of the healing stem cell population in your baby’s cord blood, so removing them has little effect on the cells you want to save. CBR's processing system separates the red blood cells from the lifesaving stem cells. Our published cell recovery rate of 99% is the highest in the industry and based on the cells you want to save.1-3

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What kinds of complications can occur when red blood cells are NOT removed?
Cryogenically frozen red blood cells often burst when thawed for use. Jagged red blood cell fragments in a transplant unit may lead to complications such as anemia, jaundice, and shock, if the cord blood is used in treatment.

Also, keeping the red blood cells requires using more cryopreservative for freezing. Increasing the amount of cryopreservative also increases the likelihood that nausea, vomiting, and side effects to the respiratory, cardiovascular, and central nervous system can occur.

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Is there anything unique about CBR's processing method?
CBR uses an automated processing method that helps ensure consistent quality across samples. Combined with our proprietary collection system, our processing method recovers the most stem cells, according to published data. Our 99% recovery rate is 20% higher than methods using Sepax® or Hespan®.1-3 This is important because having more stem cells for treatment can improve medical outcomes if the cells are ever needed for treatment.10,11

® All registered trademarks are the property of their respective holders.

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Does the hospital need to provide any materials for my baby's collection?
No. You will receive a CBR CellAdvantage Collection Kit from CBR or your healthcare provider. Your kit contains all the items your healthcare provider needs to safely and painlessly collect your baby's cord blood and cord tissue. However, you must remember to take the kit with you to the hospital when you deliver.

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Does the amount of cord blood collected matter?
Yes. Typically, collecting more cord blood means collecting more stem cells. This is important because having more stem cells for treatment can improve medical outcomes if the cells are needed for transplant.10,11 That's why CBR's CellAdvantage collection system is designed to collect more cord blood. The combination of CBR's anticoagulant and superior processing technology yields us the highest published stem cell recovery rate in the industry.1-3

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Can cord blood be collected after a C-section delivery?
Yes. CBR's cord blood collection system is fully sterile and may be used following a C-section.

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Is there any risk to my child or myself during collection?
Cord blood collection is safe and painless for you and your baby. Your healthcare provider does not need to alter the normal birthing process in any way, except to collect your baby's cord blood after the cord has been clamped and cut. Cord blood collection is a simple procedure that usually takes about 5 minutes.

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How is my baby's cord blood sent to CBR's laboratory?
CBR's One-Step ShippingSM service makes returning your baby's collection kit to our lab as simple as a single phone call. After the collection, the labor and delivery staff will return the collection kit to you or a designated family member. The collection kit is pre-labeled and folds into a crush-resistant cube.

With one phone call, CBR's convenient One-Step Shipping arranges an express courier pick-up from your hospital room so you can relax with your new baby. Real-time tracking and next-flight service to our lab in Tucson, Arizona, helps us ensure fast delivery, which is important for maximum cell viability. You will receive confirmation from us as soon as your baby's cord blood is received and processed.

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Where are my baby's cord blood stem cells stored, and how do I know they are stored safely?
Your baby's cord blood will be stored at Cord Blood Registry's state-of-the-art laboratory and storage facility in Tucson, Arizona, which is one of the safest cities in the nation in terms of risk from hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, winter storms, and tornados.6 Our 80,000-square-foot laboratory is the largest newborn stem cell bank in the world with some of the most advanced technology in the industry. We currently have the capacity to safely store cord blood for more than 5 million newborns.

Our processing, quality-control, and quality-assurance metrics are in accordance with FDA guidelines, and we are accredited by the AABB (formerly the American Association of Blood Banks) and certified by CLIA (a federal program to ensure quality laboratory testing). CBR's laboratory technology provides secure, long-term protection for your baby's stem cells.

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Shouldn't I choose a cord blood bank that is close to my home?
The safety and viability of your baby's stem cells are far more important than the proximity of the storage location to your home. Therefore, a safe geographic location combined with a high-quality processing system are the most important factors when it comes to choosing a bank. Should your family ever need them, CBR will quickly ship your stem cells to any medical center in the world.

  • Having the most stem cells for treatment and ensuring the long-term safety and viability of those cells is important. CBR goes above and beyond:  with the exclusive CBR CellAdvantage® system, every detail has been diligently developed, resulting in the best technology available for collecting, processing, and storing cord blood stem cells.
  • CBR has helped more clients use their stem cells for transplants and experimental regenerative medicine therapies than any other family bank. All of the stem cell units released for client use have been viable for treatment.

It is also important for the bank's laboratory and storage facility to be in a location that is not subject to major environmental disasters:

  • CBR's laboratory is located in Tucson, Arizona, one of the safest cities in the nation in terms of risk from hurricanes, floods, earthquakes, winter storms, and tornadoes.6

Most families will require long-term storage. Therefore, it is important to choose a cord blood bank that is financially stable and more likely to be there if you need your stem cells:

  • CBR's track record of long-term stability and financial strength demonstrates our commitment to being here for you in the future

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What happens after my baby's cord blood has been stored successfully?
As part of our complete customer service, we notify each of our clients after their newborns' stem cells have been stored. If you provide CBR with your email address, you will receive instant notification the moment your baby's cord blood is received at our lab. You will also be contacted by phone within seven business days of the sample being processed. Your baby's Certificate of Deposit will be available through your online account three weeks after the cord blood has been received. This certificate can be viewed and printed for your records.

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How long will the cord blood remain viable in the kit after collection?
For the best results, we recommend our clients call the One-Step Shipping number as soon as possible after collection. With CBR's One-Step Shipping, the collection kit is typically delivered to CBR's Arizona facility from anywhere in the U.S. in less than 24 hours.

To be safe, CBR uses dry heparin anticoagulant to help ensure collections remain viable in the case of unavoidably long shipping times.

Benefits of heparin anticoagulant

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How do I know that my baby's cord blood will not be confused with someone else's?
Your baby's cord blood is constantly tracked and easily found through our identification system:
1. Unique identifier (bar code). When you enroll with CBR, your baby's collection kit is assigned a bar code. This same identifier remains with your baby's cord blood kit, paperwork, and sample all the way to storage.
2. Client bar code label. Your cord blood sample is easily identified by the Client ID label, which is permanently attached to the storage bag. Each sample is encased in an outer protective layer to ensure the barcode never detaches from the sample.
3. Once your baby's cord blood is stored, the storage location is logged in our computer system, which we back up to tape daily.

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If my family ever needs the cord blood sample, how do we retrieve it?
Should the need arise, CBR will work with your physician to make arrangements for confirmatory testing, release, and transportation of your baby's stem cells to a designated hospital.

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The CBR Gift Registry

What is the CBR Gift Registry?
The CBR Gift Registry provides an easy way for family members and friends to support your decision to bank your newborn's stem cells. CBR's personalized gift registry enables parents-to-be to receive financial contributions toward the cost of banking with CBR by helping you:

  • Announce the decision to bank your newborn's stem cells for potential future use
    • Invite family, friends, and your entire social network to contribute to the gift of banking
    • Send customized email announcements or print contribution cards that can be added to baby shower invitations
  • Gather small contributions that could add up to pay for the cost of banking
    • CBR's secure online payment process allows flexible contribution amounts
    • Instantly be notified of all contributions and stay up-to-date on your balance
    • Use your gift registry as a “savings account” and make monthly contributions before your due date!
  • Educate others on the current and emerging benefits of newborn stem cell banking
  • Get the latest stem cell news and share videos of real families who have benefited from newborn stem cell therapies

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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Who can participate in the CBR Gift Registry?
The CBR Gift Registry is available to any family that is interested in storing their child's newborn stem cells with CBR. You do not have to be enrolled with CBR's cord blood banking service in order to start your gift registry.

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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Who is able to contribute to a CBR Gift Registry account?
Parents who register with the CBR Gift Registry can easily share their personalized registry page via email, printed announcement cards, or through various online social networks. Anyone can contribute prior to your baby's birth. Your CBR Gift Registry will automatically close when your newborn's sample is received and stored. If a contributor has specific questions about our gift registry, they may call 1.877.CORD.BLOOD (Mon-Fri: 6am - 5:30pm PST).

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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Can a family member or friend give to a Gift Registry over the phone?
The CBR Gift Registry only accepts contributions online with a valid credit card.

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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Why do I need a credit card to contribute to a Gift Registry?
To contribute to the CBR Gift Registry, you will need a valid credit card including the 3 digit code found on the back of the card. All credit transactions are secured with SSL (Secure Socket Layer) encryption. Your account will be charged immediately after you authorize your contribution.

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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Why does my account close the day my baby's newborn stem cells arrive at the lab? What happens once it is closed?
Your account closes on the day your baby's newborn stem cells arrive at the lab so we can reconcile your account before you are billed. Once your account is closed, it will no longer accept additional contributions. You will still be able to log in and check your account and remaining balance but you will not be able to send announcements.

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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What happens if I do not enroll with CBR's service to collect and store my baby's newborn stem cells?
All contributions will be refunded directly to the contributor's credit card.

Enroll in CBR's cord banking services

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What are CBR's Gift Registry terms and conditions?
By participating in CBR's Gift Registry, you consent to have your information viewed by visitors to this site. Your name, state, and month due will be displayed. In addition, you are authorizing CBR to send an email (Gift Registry announcements) to your friends and family on your behalf.

If you do not enroll in CBR's service or do not store your newborn's cord blood stem cells, contributions to your CBR Gift Registry account will be refunded back to contributors. Contributions will be refunded directly to the credit card of the contributor.

The Terms and Conditions that govern www.cordblood.com apply to www.cordblood.com/giftregistry.

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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Common Misconceptions

Misconception:
"There is no need to bank my baby's own cord blood because I can retrieve my or someone else's donated sample from a public bank."

Fact:
When you donate for public use, if the sample is eligible and stored, the cord blood may be available to any patient who needs a transplant, so you cannot assume that it will be available for your family if ever needed.

  • For families to make an informed decision, it is important to understand that not all donated samples are banked. As many as 71% of donations may be rejected by public banks based on family medical history, maternal medical history, collection volume, and examination of the maternal blood sample.32
  • Private banking helps ensure that your baby's cord blood is saved and available for your family if ever needed.

If someone in your family needs stem cells, the most important considerations are:

  • Quality of the sample – Collected, processed, and stored so that sterility and stem cell count are optimized
  • Matching donor – Stem cells from a matched relative (preferably a sibling) are generally the best treatment option in transplant situations, such as cancers and blood disorders. For those cases, having a matched family member's cord blood available may have significant advantages, including fewer complications, improved survival, and a better quality of life without the need for anti-rejection medications.28,29
  • Access to a matching sample – Many patients are unable to find a donor in the public system, especially those who belong to minority ethnic groups that are not adequately represented in public banks.33 There is no guarantee that a matched sample will be available in a public bank or within your family.
As with other medical procedures, therapies using cord blood involve risk, which should be discussed with your physician. 
For current experimental regenerative medicine applications, the child's own cord blood is required, so storing your baby's cord blood in a family bank is the only option.
"A patient's best chance of finding a match is with a brother or sister."
-National Marrow Donor Program

Why expecting parents bank their baby’s stem cells

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Misconception:
"I can donate to a public bank."

Fact:
Donating to a public bank may not be possible for several reasons:

  • Only certain hospitals are able to collect cord blood donations, so not all families can donate.
  • Based on requirements for the donor and cord blood donation, many families are  not eligible for donation for a variety of reasons, including family health history, maternal exposure to viruses, and international travel.
  • As many as 71% of donations may be rejected by public banks based on family medical history, maternal medical history, collection volume, and examination of the maternal blood sample.32
  • If families decide too late, they may be denied access to donating.

Why expecting parents bank their baby’s stem cells

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Misconception:
“Cord blood is not being used yet in medical treatments.”

Fact: Over the past 20 years34, cord blood stem cells have been used in 25,000 transplants30 to treat many life-threatening diseases, such as leukemia and other cancers. In transplant medicine, a patient generally will undergo chemotherapy and then receive an infusion of cord blood stem cells to create a healthy blood and immune system.30

In addition, a new field, called regenerative medicine, is evaluating cord blood stem cells’ ability to help repair and replace cells that have been damaged by disease or injury. These are conditions that have no cure today, such as autism, pediatric stroke, and brain injury. These therapies are still experimental and there is no guarantee that treatments will be available.

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Misconception:
“Doctors would never treat the child with his or her own cord blood stem cells because it would contain the disease.”

Fact: Thousands of autologous stem cell transplants – those using one's own stem cells from cord blood, bone marrow, and peripheral blood – are performed every year.

  • Autologous (using one's own stem cells) transplants are performed for diseases such as: Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, severe aplastic anemia, myeloma, Ewing's sarcoma, neuroblastoma, brain tumors, and other solid tumors.
  • Research from the Journal of Clinical Oncology31 reports that even with early-onset disease (within 12 months of birth), the child's stem cells are viable for use in transplantation. In the study, an autologous stem cell treatment for infants with acute leukemia was just as successful as a sibling transplant.

Autologous cord blood stem cells have many advantages as a stem cell source, including no risk of graft vs. host disease (a leading cause of death for transplant patients). In addition, like all saved cord blood, it is available quickly and the stem cells have a low risk of having been affected by environmental damage or viruses.

Experimental treatments with cord blood focus on regenerative medicine – where doctors study the use of stem cells to repair damaged tissues and organs in the body. Currently, for these applications, a child's own cord blood is required.

However, there are certain medical conditions that would not use autologous stem cells:

  • Genetic Diseases: Cord blood stem cells may not be usable if the donating child has certain genetic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia. However, gene therapy, which uses the child’s own stem cells to deliver the corrected genetic element is being investigated. Gene therapy is still experimental and may never become clinically available.
  • Certain Cancers: In earlier years of life, doctors may choose to not use a child’s own stem cells for treatment of certain cancers such as leukemia, due to the concern that an early onset may indicate a genetic component. However, if the cancer occurs later in life, the child’s cord blood stem cells may be preferable to their own adult stem cells collected during remission from the cancer. This is because of the risk of residual tumor cells in the adult stem cells, which may cause relapse.

In cases in which autologous stem cells cannot be used, a matched sibling's cord blood is the next best option, which is one of the key reasons why it is important to bank cord blood for each child in the family.28,29

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Cord Blood & Tissue Research Questions

Get answers to questions about CBR’s Center for Regenerative Medicine, umbilical cord blood and cord tissue. Plus learn the truth behind common misconceptions about cord blood banking.

CBR’s Center for Regenerative Medicine

Cord Blood Stem Cells

Cord Tissue Stem Cells

Common Misconceptions

CBR’s Center for Regenerative Medicine

Can my children participate in a clinical trial if their stem cells are not banked with CBR?
Clinical trials are evaluating cord blood stem cells for their ability to help conditions and injuries like autism, pediatric stroke, cerebral palsy, and traumatic brain injury. Currently, all FDA-regulated clinical trials require the use of a child’s banked cord blood stem cells. Several of these trials are only available to children who have their own stem cells banked with CBR.

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How are patients for clinical trials chosen?
The inclusion criteria for each trial are different. To get connected to future clinical trials that are open to CBR families, please visit CBR's Center for Regenerative Medicine.

Does CBR have academic affiliations with research institutions?
Yes. CBR’s laboratory was initially established as a pilot program partially sponsored by the American Cancer Society and the University of Arizona using technology pioneered by Dr. David T. Harris. The first to family bank a child’s own cord blood stem cells for future use, Dr. Harris is a professor of microbiology and immunology and CBR’s Director of Medicine.

CBR also has established leadership in advancing clinical research with newborn stem cells. We are the exclusive family bank partner in studies at several prestigious medical institutions, including Sutter Neuroscience Institute, Georgia Health Sciences University, Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital in Houston, and The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston (UTHealth).

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What is the difference between a clinical trial and a pre-clinical laboratory study?
Clinical trials are experimental treatments using human subjects. They are FDA-regulated and conducted by physicians and medical institutions. Pre-clinical laboratory research uses animals and in vitro studies and is performed prior to clinical trials.

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Are there risks involved in newborn stem cell treatments?
Like any medical procedure, newborn stem cell treatments may involve risks, which should be discussed with your doctor. Ultimate use of newborn stem cells will be determined by your treating physician.

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Cord Blood Stem Cells

What is cord blood?
Cord blood is the blood that remains in your newborn's umbilical cord after birth. Cord blood is a valuable source of a type of stem cell that can be used in a variety of medical treatments.

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What are stem cells?
Stem cells are the body's "master cells" because they are the building blocks of organ tissue, blood, and the immune system. Stem cells from bone marrow were first used to regenerate blood and immune cells for patients who had received chemotherapy for cancer. In the late 1980s, doctors started using cord blood stem cells to treat diseases that previously had been treated with bone marrow transplantation.

Today, cord blood stem cells are successfully being used to save lives. They also are being researched in an exciting new area of medicine called regenerative medicine, where scientists are studying the use of cord blood stem cells in experimental treatments for conditions like autism, pediatric stroke, and brain injury.

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How is cord blood used in medical treatments?
Cord blood stem cells have been successfully used in transplant medicine for more than 20 years. Cord blood has been used to treat many life-threatening diseases including leukemia, other cancers, and blood disorders, metabolic disorders, and immune diseases.34 There is no guarantee that experimental therapies will be available in the future.

Cord blood also is being used in regenerative medicine research, where stem cells are being evaluated for their ability to induce healing or regenerate cells to repair tissues. Clinical trials are evaluating a child’s own cord blood stem cell infusions as experimental therapies to treat autiswhatm, pediatric stroke, cerebral palsy, brain injury, and juvenile diabetes.

Your physician will determine if cord blood stem cells should be used and if one’s own stem cells or a matched donor’s would be the best course of treatment. Like any medical procedure, newborn stem cell treatments may involve risks, which should be discussed with your doctor. Ultimate use of newborn stem cells will be determined by your treating physician.

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What is graft vs. host disease (GvHD)?
GvHD is one of the most common and life-threatening side effects of using stem cells from another individual or "donor" to treat the patient. In fact, GvHD is the leading cause of death following a transplant. GvHD occurs when the transplanted stem cells from a donor recognize the recipient's body as foreign and attack it. Stem cells from cord blood are less likely to cause GvHD than bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cells. Family banked cord blood can help reduce GvHD and improve treatment outcomes because:

  • The stem cells in cord blood are more flexible and less reactive than adult stem cells from other sources43
  • Cord blood used between family members has a lower risk of GvHD compared to cord blood from unrelated donors28,29

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What is HLA matching?
HLA matching is the criteria used to determine donor and recipient compatibility. In cord blood, it generally refers to six proteins called human leukocyte antigens (HLA) that appear on the surface of white blood cells and other tissues in the body. A transplant would only be performed if there is an adequate HLA match between donor and recipient. A perfect six out of six match is best. Siblings are the most commonly used related donors.27

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Cord Tissue Stem Cells

What is cord tissue?
Cord tissue is your baby’s umbilical cord, which contains a rich variety of cells including mesenchymal stem cells. These stem cells can form connective tissues such as bone, cartilage, and tendon. Studies are evaluating cord tissue stem cells as possible treatments for some injuries and diseases.

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How are cord tissue stem cells different from cord blood stem cells?
Cord tissue is a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells, which create connective tissue. Cord blood is rich in hematopoietic stem cells, which create the blood and immune system. Because of the different functions of these stem cells, cord blood and cord tissue may help repair the body in different ways.  Cord tissue research is still in its early stages, and effective therapies may never develop.

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How are cord tissue stem cells being researched for use in medical treatments?
Stem cells from cord tissue are being evaluated in laboratory studies for their ability to heal spinal cord, brain, and cartilage injuries, in addition to other areas. This research is now beginning to move into clinical trials. It is at an early stage and medical treatments are not available today and may never be developed.

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Common Misconceptions

Misconception:
“Cord blood is not being used yet in medical treatments.”

Fact: Over the past 20 years34, cord blood stem cells have been used in 25,000 transplants30 to treat many life-threatening diseases, such as leukemia and other cancers. In transplant medicine, a patient generally will undergo chemotherapy and then receive an infusion of cord blood stem cells to create a healthy blood and immune system.30

In addition, a new field, called regenerative medicine, is evaluating cord blood stem cells’ ability to help repair and replace cells that have been damaged by disease or injury. These are conditions that have no cure today, such as autism, pediatric stroke, and brain injury. These therapies are still experimental and there is no guarantee that treatments will be available.

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Misconception:
“Doctors would never treat the child with his or her own cord blood stem cells because it would contain the disease.”
Fact: Thousands of autologous stem cell transplants – those using one's own stem cells from cord blood, bone marrow, and peripheral blood – are performed every year.

  • Autologous (using one's own stem cells) transplants are performed for diseases such as: Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, severe aplastic anemia, myeloma, Ewing's sarcoma, neuroblastoma, brain tumors, and other solid tumors.
  • Research from the Journal of Clinical Oncology31 reports that even with early-onset disease (within 12 months of birth), the child's stem cells are viable for use in transplantation. In the study, an autologous stem cell treatment for infants with acute leukemia was just as successful as a sibling transplant.

Autologous cord blood stem cells have many advantages as a stem cell source, including no risk of graft vs. host disease (a leading cause of death for transplant patients). In addition, like all saved cord blood, it is available quickly and the stem cells have a low risk of having been affected by environmental damage or viruses.

Experimental treatments with cord blood focus on regenerative medicine – where doctors study the use of stem cells to repair damaged tissues and organs in the body. Currently, for these applications, a child's own cord blood is required.

However, there are certain medical conditions that would not use autologous stem cells:

  • Genetic Diseases: Cord blood stem cells may not be usable if the donating child has certain genetic diseases, such as sickle cell anemia. However, gene therapy, which uses the child’s own stem cells to deliver the corrected genetic element is being investigated. Gene therapy is still experimental and may never become clinically available.
  • Certain Cancers: In earlier years of life, doctors may choose to not use a child’s own stem cells for treatment of certain cancers such as leukemia, due to the concern that an early onset may indicate a genetic component. However, if the cancer occurs later in life, the child’s cord blood stem cells may be preferable to their own adult stem cells collected during remission from the cancer. This is because of the risk of residual tumor cells in the adult stem cells, which may cause relapse.

In cases in which autologous stem cells cannot be used, a matched sibling's cord blood is the next best option, which is one of the key reasons why it is important to bank cord blood for each child in the family.28,29

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Services and Pricing Questions

Get answers to questions about CBR's processes, pricing, and enrollment, plus clarify a common misconception about the cost of banking.

Cord Blood and Cord Tissue - How they May Help in Different Ways

Special Pricing and Costs

The Enrollment Process

The CBR Gift Registry

Common Misconceptions

Cord Blood or Cord Tissue? What's Best for Your Family?

How are cord tissue stem cells different from cord blood stem cells?
Cord tissue is a rich source of mesenchymal stem cells, which create connective tissue. Cord blood is a rich source of hematopoietic stem cells, which create the blood and immune system. Because of the different functions of these stem cells, cord blood and cord tissue may help repair the body in different ways. Cord tissue is still in early research stages and effective therapies may never be developed.

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What is cord blood banking, and how is it done?
Cord blood banking is a one-time opportunity to save your baby's cord blood stem cells for potential medical uses. Having cord blood saved can be lifesaving or life-changing for your baby or other family members and ensures that these cells are immediately available if ever needed.

Collecting cord blood is a simple, safe, and painless procedure that usually takes less than five minutes and happens immediately after birth. After the umbilical cord has been cut, the remaining blood in the cord is collected. The cord blood is then shipped to the laboratory and frozen in cryogenic storage tanks for long-term preservation.

If you do not save your baby's cord blood, it will be discarded after birth.

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What is cord tissue banking, and how is it done?
CBR was the first bank to offer U.S. families the opportunity to save a segment of their baby's umbilical cord. The primary cells in cord tissue are different from the primary cells found in cord blood and may help repair the body in different ways. Saving both sources of stem cells may offer access to even more medicine in the future.

After your baby's umbilical cord has been clamped and cut, and after cord blood collection, your doctor or midwife will collect a 4- to 8-inch segment of the umbilical cord and place it in the CBR CordCup® container. The collection kit is then returned to CBR's laboratory by an express courier. Cord tissue collection is safe for both the mother and baby and can be done after vaginal or C-section births.

Because cord tissue research is still in its early stages, CBR stores your baby's cord tissue whole, preserving all of the cells within it for your family's potential future use. The cord tissue is cryogenically stored for long-term preservation so it can be processed to extract the cells needed using the best technology of the future. Cord tissue is still in early research stages and effective therapies may never be developed.

If you do not save your baby's cord tissue, it is discarded as medical waste.

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Special Pricing and Costs

How much does it cost to save my newborn's stem cells?
Click here to view CBR's pricing options for saving your newborn's cord blood and/or cord tissue stem cells.

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Is there special pricing for multiple births?
CBR has special pricing available in the event of multiple births (twins, triplets, etc.). Click here to view our multiple births pricing.

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Is cord blood banking an eligible expense through my FSA/HSA?
Not currently; however The Family Cord Blood Banking Act is expected to be re-introduced in the House of Representatives in 2013. This bill would amend the tax code to treat the cost of family banking (initial enrollment as well as annual storage fees) as a qualified medical expense. If you would like to support this effort, please contact your representative and let them know that lowering the cost of cord blood banking is important to you and your family.

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Will I be charged a fee by my healthcare provider for the collection?
Similar to services like circumcision, your provider may charge a fee to collect your newborn's stem cells. Please check with your insurance carrier to see if they cover this fee.

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What is the cost of saving my baby's cord tissue?
Click here to learn about pricing.

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Who owns my baby's banked newborn stem cells?
Your baby's banked stem cells belong to your baby.  As your baby's legal guardian, you act on your baby's behalf in deciding what to do with the stem cells until the child turns 18 years old.  After the child is 18 years old, only he or she can decide what to do with the cells.  If you terminate the storage contract with CBR before the child turns 18, you are deciding that it is your child's best interests to not save these stem cells anymore.  In such case, CBR will own the sample.  If you terminate the storage contract after the child turns 18, we will attempt to contact the child for instruction on whether to terminate the account.

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The Enrollment Process

How do I enroll with Cord Blood Registry to save my newborn's cord blood and/or cord tissue stem cells?
The enrollment process is quick and easy. We offer two methods of enrollment for your convenience - either online or over the phone.

Call 1.877.CORD.BLOOD
Monday through Friday, 6:00 am to 9:00 pm PT
Saturday and Sunday, 6:00 am to 4:00 pm PT
We will ship your CBR CellAdvantage Collection Kit immediately after your enrollment is complete.

Enroll in CBR's cord banking services

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When should I enroll with CBR?
Many babies arrive before their due date. You only have one opportunity to bank your baby's cord blood and cord tissue, so we strongly recommend making the decision during your second trimester, if possible. However, CBR can overnight a collection kit to you if your due date is near.

Enroll in CBR's cord banking services

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I'm planning to adopt. How does that change the process?
CBR has participated in hundreds of adoption cases for our clients. We are very experienced with the unique issues surrounding the adoption process as it relates to newborn stem cell collection and storage. For more details, please contact a Cord Blood Education Specialist at 1.877.CORD.BLOOD.

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How does CBR ensure the confidentiality of my personal information?
CBR takes confidentiality seriously. Because of the sensitive nature of families' medical information, all CBR employees sign confidentiality agreements. The collection and use of your personal information is governed by our privacy policy. Click here to view our privacy policy.

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What if I do not live in the U.S.?
We proudly serve clients in more than 80 countries around the world. International couriers are available to provide customs clearance and typically provide delivery to our laboratory within 36 hours of collection.5 International shipping fees will vary.

Pricing for international cord banking

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The CBR Gift Registry

What is The CBR Gift Registry?
The CBR Gift Registry provides an easy way for family members and friends to support your decision to bank your newborn's stem cells. CBR's personalized gift registry enables parents-to-be to receive financial contributions toward the cost of banking with CBR by helping you:

  • Announce the decision to bank your newborn's stem cells for potential future use
    • Invite family, friends, and your entire social network to contribute to the gift of banking
    • Send customized email announcements or print contribution cards that can be added to baby shower invitations
  • Gather small contributions that could add up to pay for the cost of banking
    • CBR's secure online payment process allows flexible contribution amounts
    • Instantly be notified of all contributions and stay up-to-date on your balance
    • Use your gift registry as a “savings account” and make monthly contributions before your due date!
  • Educate others on the current and emerging benefits of newborn stem cell banking
  • Get the latest stem cell news and share videos of real families who have benefited from newborn stem cell therapies

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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Who can participate in the CBR Gift Registry?
The CBR Gift Registry is available to any family that is interested in storing their child's newborn stem cells with CBR. You do not have to be enrolled with CBR's cord blood banking service in order to start your gift registry.

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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Who is able to contribute to a CBR Gift Registry account?
Parents who register with the CBR Gift Registry can easily share their personalized registry page via email, printed announcement cards, or through various online social networks. Anyone can contribute prior to your baby's birth. Your CBR Gift Registry will automatically close when your newborn's sample is received and stored. If a contributor has specific questions about our gift registry, they may call 1.877.CORD.BLOOD (Mon-Fri: 6am - 5:30pm PST).

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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Can a family member or friend give to a Gift Registry over the phone?
The CBR Gift Registry only accepts contributions online with a valid credit card.

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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Why do I need a credit card to contribute to a Gift Registry?
To contribute to the CBR Gift Registry, you will need a valid credit card including the 3 digit code found on the back of the card. All credit transactions are secured with SSL (Secure Socket Layer) encryption. Your account will be charged immediately after you authorize your contribution.

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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What if I opt to pay my cord blood banking first-year fees in full? How will I receive my contributions?
If you opt to pay your processing fee in full, your contributions will be deducted from the amount you would have paid. Remember, you are not charged until after your baby is born. For example, you opted to pay in full once the baby is born ($1,995) and receive $900 in contributions. Your new total due would be $1,095 once your baby is born.

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Why does my account close the day my baby's newborn stem cells arrive at the lab? What happens once it is closed?
Your account closes on the day your baby's newborn stem cells arrive at the lab so we can reconcile your account before you are billed. Once your account is closed, it will no longer accept additional contributions. You will still be able to log in and check your account and remaining balance but you will not be able to send announcements.

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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What happens if I do not enroll with CBR's service to collect and store my baby's newborn stem cells?
All contributions will be refunded directly to the contributor's credit card.

Enroll in CBR's cord banking services

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What are CBR's Gift Registry terms and conditions?
By participating in CBR's Gift Registry, you consent to have your information viewed by visitors to this site. Your name, state, and month due will be displayed. In addition, you are authorizing CBR to send an email (Gift Registry announcements) to your friends and family on your behalf.

If you do not enroll in CBR's service or do not store your newborn's cord blood stem cells, contributions to your CBR Gift Registry account will be refunded back to contributors. Contributions will be refunded directly to the credit card of the contributor.

The Terms and Conditions that govern www.cordblood.com apply to www.cordblood.com/giftregistry.

CBR's gift registry for expecting mothers

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Common Misconceptions

"Cord blood banking is too expensive for most families."
   
Fact: The first-year fee for newborn stem cell banking is similar to common household purchases, such as a vacation or a new TV. After the initial collection and processing, the annual storage fee works out to be about $11/month.

Compared to the other ways you already protect your family, such as home or auto insurance, saving your baby's cord blood could offer the most valuable protection of all. Because if you ever need it, the lifesaving potential of cord blood stem cells is priceless.

CBR offers several options to help make cord blood banking affordable for every family:

  • Monthly payment plans, including $55 per month for 48 months for cord blood banking
  • The CBR Gift Registry to which family and friends can contribute
  • Prepay and save

CBR also offers a Newborn Possibilities Program, which provides cord blood and cord tissue collection, processing, and five years of storage at no cost to families with a medical need.

Learn more about the value of cord blood and tissue banking and your payment options for saving this potentially lifesaving resource.

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